Tuesday, April 22, 2014

the-full-grohac:

nevver:

Time is a Flat Circus

Quotes from True Detective on Family Circus are surprisingly good. 

Saturday, April 19, 2014

guardian:

How to transform a Victorian warehouse for just £800 - in pictures

Bobby Petersen has turned an industrial loft from an abandoned graffitied shell into an airy live/work space using clever ideas and a tiny budget. Here’s how

Want

Friday, April 18, 2014
I don’t know if this is really cute or I’m just kind of lovesick

I don’t know if this is really cute or I’m just kind of lovesick

(Source: zarahys)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

leanin:

"Strong is the New Pretty" is a new photo series by Kate Parker which shows her two daughters and their friends "just as they are: loud, athletic, fearless, messy, joyous, frustrated. I wanted to celebrate them, just as they are, and show them that is enough.  Being pretty or perfect is not important. Being who they are is."

Photos by Kate T. Parker.

LOVE the last one

Thursday, April 10, 2014

artandsciencejournal:

Flower ‘Bulbs’

Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.

German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.

Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.

Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch

Want all of these

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

kateoplis:

NPR covers all 2,428 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, so you don’t have to.

The results are beautiful.

Sunday, April 6, 2014
atamponinaglass:

IS THIS CONDUCTIVE INK IM GOING TO SCREAM

atamponinaglass:

IS THIS CONDUCTIVE INK IM GOING TO SCREAM

Saturday, April 5, 2014

calliopesmuse:

glencocobro:

sizvideos:

Watch Honey Maid’s awesome answer about the backlash they received 

so powerful

This is beautiful and perfect and EXACTLY as the world should be.

It’s a well known fact that liberals consume more s’mores annually. The liberal bias of the Girl Scouts can be cited as supporting evidence.

wnyc:

In the city that never sleeps, are you getting enough? Join WNYC’s sleep study and find out what is really going on in your bed.
WNYC.ORG/SLEEP

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
newsweek:

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.
On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.
As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.
Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.
What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

newsweek:

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

steepravine:

Colorful Mushroom Tackle Box
A small sampling of the amazing mushrooms we found yesterday.
(Salt Point, California - 3/2014)

steepravine:

Colorful Mushroom Tackle Box

A small sampling of the amazing mushrooms we found yesterday.

(Salt Point, California - 3/2014)

Tuesday, April 1, 2014
theatlantic:

The Myth of Working Your Way Through College

Once upon a time, a summer spent scooping ice cream could pay for a year of college. Today, the average student’s annual tuition is equivalent to 991 hours behind the counter.  
Read more. [Image: Columbia Pictures]


Did the math, that’s 20 hours/week, 52 weeks/year

theatlantic:

The Myth of Working Your Way Through College

Once upon a time, a summer spent scooping ice cream could pay for a year of college. Today, the average student’s annual tuition is equivalent to 991 hours behind the counter.  

Read more. [Image: Columbia Pictures]


Did the math, that’s 20 hours/week, 52 weeks/year